Learn About Al-Anon support-groups

The Brief History Of Al-Anon

Al-Anon is a network of family support groups, which helps persons whose families are affected by alcoholism. This kind of a support group is after assisting people overcome their addiction to alcohol.

Al- Anon is a support organization for the friends and family members of problem drinkers, founded in 1951. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the first alcoholic support group that was started by the husband of Lois Wilson who went on to later start her own support group, Al-Anon. She herself faced the challenge of supporting a convalescent alcoholic, so, she created an organization aimed at people with the same problem. Al-Anon thrives through the contributions of its members. Meetings are available to assist family members and friends of alcoholics adjust and better serve their loved ones, even if their loved ones have not recovered.

These groups help their members know there are others like them.

Alcoholism Affecting A Family

Al-Anon recognizes that alcoholism affects everyone in the family not just the addicted member. For an alcoholic to recover, they need the support of friends and family.

Some family members blame themselves for their loved one's drinking or may not realise why recovery is their loved one's primary concern. Meetings deal with these issues and make members understand that alcoholism is a family illness.

Alateen- Al-Anon Groups For Teens

Besides, Al-Anon has a group named Alateen organized specially for young people whose family member suffers from alcoholism.

The meetings held by Alateen help youngsters to meet with individuals within their age group in order to make their experiences more beneficial and interrelated.

Reasons To Partake In An Al-Anon Group

Members benefit from Al-Anon because they are introduced to many people and families who suffer from alcoholism. All members have worked through some issues though the details may differ. The main advantage of Al-Anon is searching people who have had similar experiences to talk to. These meetings are widespread all over the country. Give us a call on 0800 772 3971 to assist you find one close by you.

What Happens During The Meetings

If you know someone who is an alcoholic, then Al-Anon is the best place for you. You can get all the help required if you are being affected by the drinking behaviour of a person you know.

The outcomes of these meetings is what scares some people from coming. What you must remember when you attend an Al-Anon meeting

  • Al-Anon is anonymous, which is highly essential
  • Whether personally or through a family member, everyone in each meeting has been impacted by alcoholism
  • Getting things off your chest is one way of recovery encouraged in this group although it is not mandatory
  • The Meetings Usually Vary
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • Al-Anon is not an organization which is based on any religion
  • The meetings are concentrating on the 12-step program which has been designed by Al-Anon

The Al-Anon meetings work on the "take what you like and leave the rest" philosophy Based on this formula the meetings concentrate on the sharing of experiences and the hardships of the attendees rather than giving them any instructions about what they should do.

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The 12 Parts Of Al-Anon

The recovery stages are outlined before the meeting starts. These 12 steps have been adapted from a similar program which is also implemented by Alcoholics Anonymous. Members of Al-Anon can take help from a sponsor who can assist them to work through the steps and is available for any support needed during hardships of any kind just as the case is with Alcoholics Anonymous. The 12 Steps are as follows

  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • The members learn how to accept alcohol addiction as an illness, which they cannot control if somebody else suffers from it.
  • Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • Members often drive themselves to the brink in an attempt to change or control their loved one.
  • They understand to accept that they can revert to sanity, after acknowledging they are powerless.
  • Made a resolution to turn our lives and our will over to the care of God in a way we perceived Him.
  • It is important that members learn to let go.
  • Carry out a thorough and undaunted moral inventory of ourselves.
  • This is where the journey of self-discovery begins.
  • A list of how they may have offended themselves or their loved ones (such as with threats) is made by attendees.
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrong doings.
  • Writing each problem enables them to examine them one by one.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This step is highly essential as it is the complete acceptance of the recovery process supported by a Higher Power.
  • Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  • When they reach This point, the member can realize the part they played by judging and trying to control their loved ones which could have driven them into more drinking.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  • The road to recovery is a personal effort.
  • Most people believe they caused their loved one to start drinking.
  • These people had better be willing to forgive and make amends to themselves.
  • Made amends to such people directly where feasible, except for the cases when doing so is likely to hurt them or others.
  • After you are willing to make amends, the following step is to act on it.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Passing through these twelve Steps is a time-consuming process.
  • There is also a possibility for relapse when trying to recover in the program.
  • Step 10 makes this clear that the process takes long.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This is taking personal spiritual responsibility and surrender so as to start healing.
  • Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps we tried to carry this message to others and to practice these principles in our affairs.
  • This stage appreciates the fact that the process is long and doesnt end after a while.
  • It is a support group and members get to assist other members get through the whole process.

Recognising The Higher Power

Despite Al-Anon not being a religious program of any kind, the members within do have an acceptance of a greater power. Nevertheless, the term " higher power" is open to imply as one's own individual beliefs. Al-Anon gladly accepts members from all religious traditions and denominations; nobody is forced to alter their beliefs here.