Talk To Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

Drug education in the UK was changed forever ten years ago when a Swat team raided a quiet suburban kitchen. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. A sort of comedy was also brought into the message in the bid to pass it appropriately.

The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."

Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.

According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.

Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.

By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.

Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

Understanding the true information behind the message was very difficult. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.

What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. FRANK has run lots of media campaigns on radio and the internet.

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FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs

  • A website
  • A private phone number, accessible 24 hours a day
  • Email help
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A service to find treatment and counselling